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~ YATES COUNTY CHRONICLE ~ WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1910 ~

THE SAMPSON THEATER
New Playhouse to Be Open to Public To-
night With the Play, “The Cheater.”

FIRE PROOF AND HAS MODERN EQUIPMENT
Has Seating Capacity of About 900, With Twelve Boxes
More Than 50,000 Cubic Feet of Masonry Necessary
In Construction, Requiring 8 Tons of Cement.

     The new Sampson Theatre will be open to the public tonight in Louis Mann’s laughable play, “The Cheater,” adapted from the German play, “Der Deppelmench.” Dr. Frank Sampson, who has had the pluck and enterprise to build such an elaborate play house, is to be congratulated. Few towns in Western New York have such an attractive opera house. The building is practically fire proof as the walls, floors and even the ceilings are of cement. Dr. Sampson is responsible for the plans, having as his consulting architect Frank Harrison, who has had charge of the carpenter work.
     The structure is 60x100 feet, three stories, about 70 feet high in the rear and 55 feet above street level. Abner Carey, who has had the mason work in charge, says eight carloads of cement were used and that there are over 50,000 cubic feet of masonry in the building. The walls are twenty inches thick at the base and fifteen inches at the roof. The Jacob street front is faced with cement brick.
     The seating capacity of the house will be over 900. There are 365 seats on the ground floor, 210 in the balcony and 300 in the upper balcony or gallery. The twelve boxes will seat 48.
     The stage is 36 feet deep and 58 feet wide. There is a lift of 55 feet from the stage floor to the rigging loft or gridiron. About one and one-half miles of five-eights inch rope is used for curtains and scenery. The proscenium is 32 feet wide by 25 high.
     There are eight dressing rooms and these are of cement.
     The lighting scheme is artistic and is the work of Murray, the electrician. A large circle of incandescent burners surrounded by three smaller circles decorates the ceiling. There are rows of lights along the balcony and gallery and three in the rear of each. Each box is lighted and there are four rows of white and colored lights on the stage.      The seats are of the latest style, with hat rack, and are bolted through cement to planking below.
     The aisles and boxes will be covered with velvet carpet.
     W. N. Newby & Son, of Penn Yan, had the wall decoration in charge, while Chadwick & Haskin, of Interlachen, furnished the curtains and scenery.
     The drop curtain is a beauty, containing as it does a reproduction of Esperanza, the summer home of Wendell T. Bush, who donated the curtain.
     The building will be heated by steam.
     The ticket office is at the right of the main entrance, check room at the left. The entrance to the gallery is from Champlin street.
     The attaches of the house are: Manager, Charles H. Sisson; treasurer, Miss Matie Sabin; stage manager, Frank Maring; musical director, Byron Jackson; chief usher, Harold Tuthill; main door attendant, Frank Scanlon; gallery attendant, Elmer Meeks.

Thanks to Jan Thorn for help with the typing!